How does the resolution of lizabeth’s conflict in “marigolds” develop the theme?

How does the resolution of lizabeth’s conflict in “marigolds” develop the theme? a.)lizabeth realizes that miss lottie is not a witch but a broken person trying to make a little beauty in her world. b.)lizabeth is able to express her deep anger by ripping up all of miss lottie’s marigolds. c.)the late-night outing with her brother brings lizabeth a sense of companionship. d.)lizabeth is able to replace the lost marigolds and bring peace to miss lottie’s life.

Answers

The answer is A. Lizabeth goes back to Miss Lottie's house to wreck her marigolds but then realizes that she is just a broken person trying to brighten up her world.

Lizabeth recognizes that she has looked only at herself rather than at other people.

"Marigold" is a short story by Eugenia Collier published in 1969. The story deals with Lizabeth, an African American girl growing up in rural Maryland during the Great Depression. It addresses themes such as poverty, maturity, innocence and compassion.

In the story, Lizabeth is upset due to the struggles of her family, which causes her to destroy the marigolds that her neighbour has in her garden. She ends up regretting her actions and apologizing. The story ends with Lizabeth, now an adult, realizing that innocence cannot coexist with compassion.

Lizabeth recognizes that she has looked only at herself rather than at other people.

Explanation:

A: By looking at what was beneath the surface of Miss Lottie, Lizabeth recognizes why the old woman tended the marigolds.

Explanation:

WHen Lizbeth sees her whole world crumbled and then goes and destroys all of the garden of Miss Lottie, an old woman that had no family, she realized why she took such good and loving care of the marigolds, because she had nothing and the marigolds were the only happy among the dirt that was left for her after life had taken everything from her.

D.

Explanation:

i took the test

In question 3, the correct answer is A.

During her childhood, neither Lizabeth nor her brother or her friends understood why Miss Lottie tended to the marigolds so carefully.

After the afternoon when they stoned Miss Lottie and some of her marigolds, Lizbeth felt guilty and scared. The world made no sense to her. Her mother was no longer present, her father had crumbled. And in a childish tantrum, she went to Miss Lottie's house and destroyed her whole garden.

It was only after that, when she noticed Miss Lottie's expression on seeing her lost flowers that she knew why she had planted them. Lizbeth understood that the flowers represented hope for a woman that had nothing. A glimpse of beauty among the dirt. A place to direct whatever love and joy life had not taken from her.

In question 4, the correct answer is B.

At the beginning of the story, Lizabeth states that, whenever she thought of her hometown, she remembered the dust. But that she also remembered Miss Lottie's maridgolds.

After growing up, Lizbeth understood better the truth of her living situation as a child. She explains that, at the time, everyone around her were equally as poor, and therefore she did not have a real idea of their poverty. Now, she sees it with the perspective of an adult that knows the world and its conditions.

But, when thinking about that dreadful past, filled with dirt, and destroyed homes and families, she stills remembers the marigolds. The bright yellow flowers that brought beauty even to a wrecked hut as that of Miss Lottie's.

Lizabeth realizes that Miss Lottie is not mean but a broken person trying to create beauty in her world.

Explanation:

The best answer is indeed letter A) Lizabeth realizes that Miss Lottie is not a witch but a broken person trying to make a little beauty in her world.

Explanation:

In the short story "Marigolds", Lizabeth is a 14-year-old girl who lives in a poor neighborhood. The poorest of the houses belongs to Miss Lottie. Even though it is the ugliest house, it has a most beautiful garden full of Marigolds tended by Miss Lottie. Lizabeth and the other kids in the neighborhood would often throw rocks into the garden and tease Miss Lottie for being - in their childish belief - a witch.

At the end of the story, Lizabeth's destroying Miss Lottie's garden is a means to express her anger. Still, that in itself would not solve the conflict. Lizabeth's anger came from the realization that she and her family were poor and hopeless. She had heard her own father cry because he hadn't been able to get a job for a long time - the story takes place during the Great Depression. After ripping out all the flowers, Lizabeth realizes why she hated the garden so much: because it brought beauty and hope to a place that had none of those things. The garden represented something she was not able to understand; at least, not until that moment. After her hideous act, Lizabeth becomes a woman. Her way to see the world - and Miss Lottie - changes. Her childish conceptions are now gone.

The resolution of Lizabeth’s conflict in “Marigolds” develop the theme as:

Lizabeth realizes that Miss Lottie is not mean but a broken person trying to create beauty in her world.

Miss Lottie's marigolds are used as the symbol in the short story “Marigolds”. They symbolize things which people add in their lives in order to make it beautiful and bearable. Since Miss Lottie had been an outcast, therefore to be occupied with some work she had planted marigolds which helps her in being busy in her life.

B) By looking at what was beneath the surface of Miss Lottie, Lizabeth recognizes why the old woman tended the marigolds.

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