In this excerpt wheatley uses hyperbole to show

In this excerpt wheatley uses hyperbole to show

Answers

The strength she witnesses in the king.

The correct answer is  D. the success she wishes for the king.

Explanation:

It is seen that this particular poem is praising King George. Part of the excerpt says: "The crown upon your brows may flourish long" and Wheatley hopes that king's "scepter num'rous nations sway".  Wheatly is showing appreciation for the king and she knows that the kingdom is happy to have him as her king because she says "beloved by all the nations round".

D) The success she wishes for the king.

Explanation:

The speaker is not stating facts, nor admiration, she is stating what she wishes for the king: many ruling years or long live to the king (" The crown upon your brows may flourish long,"), divine support, almightiness, and fear, obedience, and love from the people, the nations. In this excerpt, the word "may" acts as a helping verb to utter all these wishes or prayers.

d) The success she wishes for the king

Explanation:

Hyperbole is a literary device that employs the usage of exaggeration to drive home the point being made or allured to; it must never be taken literally.

From the excerpt (second and fourth line), we see the answer to the question:

In line 2 "The crown upon your brows may flourish long", Wheatley expressed her desire to see the king reign for a long time. Line 4 "O may your sceptre num'rous nations sway" is Wheatley hoping and desiring the king conquer and take over more territories and nations.

As such, we see Wheatley uses hyperbole to show the success she wishes for the king

In this excerpt, Wheatley uses hyperbole to show the success she wishes for the king.

Explanation:

Hyperbole is the use of exaggerated words to describe something. It is mainy significant by people who lay too much emphasis on something, making it seem out-of-the-world and whose meaning cannot be literally taken into account.

Phillis Wheatley's poem "To the King's Most Excellent Majesty" is a poem that is a form of praise and appreciation for King George. The poem, though short, presents the king in a graceful manner. Through the use of the words as given in the first stanza of the poem, she uses hyperbole to express her wish that the king be blessed and successful.

Thus, the correct answer is the last option.

The hyperbole is used to accentuate the King's power.

Explanation:

In this excerpt the hyperbole is seen throughout he whole quartet. The first line that could lead to think so is "The crown upon your brows may flourish long," where the crown is highlighted as a sign of power, and flourish would mean to maintain or preserve this power. Then, the use of "Sceptre" exhibits the will to conquer other lands, which again, refers to the king's power.

At the end "And all with love and readiness obey!" refers again, to the power, but this time over the people. It's important to remember that Kings were the supreme authority, and therefore people owed respect and admiration to them. That, again, takes the reader to understand how powerful this king was, not only in his kingdom and with his people, but also between other nations.

The poem praises King George. The author says that "brows may flourish long" and hopes that king's "sceptre num'rous nations sway". She hails her king being great and thinks that her nation is happy because of the KIng saying that "beloved by all the nations round". The interpretation of the lines show that the correct answer is the success she wishes for the king.

the success she wishes for the king.

Explanation:

IN this excerpt you can read a little ode of good wishes to the King, with the first verse saying The crown upon your brows may flourish long, she wishes him a great and long reign, and he wishes him that his army is favored with good powerful men and that he rule over nation that love him and obbey him.

D the success she wishes for the king
He used a hyperbole to show how grateful the people should be when the king was brought in office.

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