Many free radicals combine to form molecules that do not contain any unpaired electrons. The driving force for the radical–radical

Many free radicals combine to form molecules that do not contain any unpaired electrons. The driving force for the radical–radical combination reaction is the formation of a new electron‑pair bond. Consider the formation of hydrogen peroxide. 2OH(g)⟶H2O2(g) Write Lewis formulas for the reactant and product species in the chemical equation. Include nonbonding electrons.

Answers

In the attached image the Lewis equation is shown where it is shown how two oxygens react with two hydrogens to meet the octet of the electrons.

Explanation:

Hydrogen peroxide is one of the most named chemicals since it is not only sold as "hydrogen peroxide" in pharmacies but it is also one of the great weapons of immune defense cells to defend ourselves against anaerobic bacteria.

The disadvantage of this compound is that when dividing it forms free oxygen radicals that are considered toxic or aging for our body.


Many free radicals combine to form molecules that do not contain any unpaired electrons. The driving

The attached figure is the Lewis structure for the reaction.

Explanation:

The Lewis structure is a structure of the molecule in which valence electrons are represented as points that are located between the atoms that are linked, such that a pair of points means a simple covalent bond (line). The points representing non-bond electrons are placed adjacent to the atoms to which they are associated.


Many free radicals combine to form molecules that do not contain any unpaired electrons. The driving

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