Overharvesting encourages extinction and is most likely to affect overharvesting encourages extinction and is most likely to affect

Overharvesting encourages extinction and is most likely to affect overharvesting encourages extinction and is most likely to affect animals that occupy a broad ecological niche edge-adapted species large animals with low intrinsic reproductive rates most organisms that live in the oceans' coral reefs

Answers

Overharvesting encourages extinction and is most likely to affect the large animals with low intrinsic reproductive rates. Overharvesting is among the activities threatening the global biodiversity, together with pollution, introduced species, habitat destruction and habitat fragmentation. For example in the marine environments, overharvesting or overfishing leads to depletion of some species to very low numbers and drives others to extinction. 

Most ocean life is found in coastal habitats. Coastal habitats have more light than the deep ocean resulting in a higher concentration of organisms. Plant species are especially abundant in coastal habitats.

The correct answer is option A, The lack of sunlight in the deep ocean limits the types of organisms that can survive

Reason –  

Sunlight is very essential for the plant species to survive in the deep ocean. Due to unavailability of sunlight at greater depths in the ocean, marine plants are unable to survive. As the survival of several marine species depends on marine plants, with less or no marine plants at greater depths, very few animal species are able to survive. Also there is lack of oxygen at greater depths, most of the high form of life (which are dependent on oxygen for their survival) are unable to survive in absence or limited supply of oxygen.  

The lack of sunlight in the deep ocean limits the types of organisms that can survive.

Explanation:

Limiting factors are biotic or abiotic environmental factors that limit the distribution of organisms in that an environment. The factor varies from environment to environment, habitat to habitat and biome to biome.

Oxygen level, temperature, salinity and light are indeed some of the abiotic factors limiting the distribution of organisms in the seas/oceans.

However, oxygen levels in deep ocean cannot be too high for organisms to survive, and while variation in temperature do exist between shallow and deep ocean, it is never to the point of freezing. Also, while salinity do limit the distribution of organisms in the ocean, no part of the ocean is too salty for marine organism.

The major limiting factor is light. While the shallow end of the ocean is adequately illuminated to sustain photosynthetic and other diverse forms of organisms, the deep end is occupied by less diverse organisms that have developed necessary adaptation to low light.

C. below 50degrees c.
C.below 50 degrees c.
I would say the answer is d. large animals with low intrinsic reproductive rates. Large animals typically occupy positions high on the food chain, and it is likely that an environment would not be able to support a large population. Their relatively small population and low reproduction rates would mean that a population of this kind of species would require a long time to recover from over-harvesting. Another danger is that the population would not recover at all if the genetic diversity in the population becomes too small. 
The lack of sunlight in deep oceans limit these types of organisms that can survive
The lack of sunlight in the deep ocean limits  the types of organisms that can survive
Yes they can, because intertidal areas are just another name for littoral zone. A littoral zone is part of a area with water, I think but i'm not 100% sure.

Hope this helps!! 🙂

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