Read the passage and answer the question. [1620] . . so as there died sometimes two or three of a day, in the foresaid time; that

Read the passage and answer the question. [1620] . . so as there died sometimes two or three of a day, in the foresaid time; that of one hundred and odd persons, scarce fifty remained. and of these in the time of most distress, there was but six or seven sound persons, who, to their great commendations be in spoken, spared no pains, night nor day, but with abundance of toil and hazard of their own health, fetched them wood, made them fires, dressed them meat, made their beds, washed their loathsome clothes, clothed and unclothed them; in a word, did all the homely and necessary offices for them which dainty and queasy stomachs cannot endure to hear named; and all this willingly and cheerfully, without any grudging in the least, showing herein their true love unto their friends and brethren. in the above passage, which word best describes how bradford feels about the caretakers of the ill? lucky selfless foolhardy despondent

Answers

selfless

Explanation:

Altruism is a word that indicates an attitude of love of neighbor or absence of selfishness. In the text shown in the question, Bradford considers caregivers of sick people altruistic, because for him, these people do a painful and bad job without selfishness and showing love and care to those who are going through a difficult situation. Patient caregivers deliver the best they have to do a service that helps and comforts people.

Selfless

Explanation:

The caretakers unselfishly and willingly did many things for the ill, which, as the speaker says, “dainty and queasy stomachs cannot endure to hear named.” They, who were the only ones in good condition, were concerned more with the needs of their friends than their own's and diligently worked to take care of them. Through this description, then, Bradford wants to convey the selfless nature of the caretakers.

Most of the above passage includes descriptions of the tasks that the caretakers did for the sick, but if you look where Bradford first mentions those caretakers, you can see just how he feels about them. This phrase, "there was but six or seven sound persons, who, to their great commendations be in spoken, spared no pains, night nor day, but with abundance of toil and hazard of their own health" holds the key. If you look closely at this phrase, Bradford describes how many people acted as caretakers (six or seven) and includes a single word, "commendations," that means praise. To suggests they deserve "great commendations" tells the reader that Bradford feels like these caretakers deserve the highest praise for what they do. My answer, then, would be the word "commendations." 

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