The phosphate transport system in bacteria imports phosphate into the cell even when the concentration of phosphate outside the cell

The phosphate transport system in bacteria imports phosphate into the cell even when the concentration of phosphate outside the cell is much lower than the cytoplasmic phosphate concentration. phosphate import depends on a ph gradient across the membranemore acidic outside the cell than inside the cell. in this bacterial cell, phosphate transport is an example of

Answers

Co-transport.

Explanation:

Co-transport may be defined as the process of transport of two molecules across the membrane without the use of energy. Two types of co transport are symport and antiport.

The bacteria transport system import phosphate into the cell. The import of the phosphate depends on pH. Since, the import of phosphate depends on pH and does not depend on the ATPase activity. Here, the phosphate molecules can simultaneously cross the membranes.

Thus, the answer is co-transport.

Cotranport.

Explanation:

Since  phosphate molecules  were moved  against the  concentration gradients, and H+  moved down the concentration gradient, then this is a co-transport; a form of secondary active transport system that coupled movements of one molecules with another.Because Energy is needed to move phosphate  ions  against its concentration gradient,it is an example of (secondary active transport) .

However because Hydrogen ions  are moved down the concentration gradients  relative to phosphate ions into the bacterial it is symporter ,This is an example of (Facilitated diffusion).

Basically, the energy for the movements of phosphate ions  against the concentration gradient is  obtained from the ionic difference of the influx of hydrogen ions.

The hydrogen ions binds first, and this drive the phospate ions inwrds.Thus phospahte movements is called secondary active transport because apart from ATP,another source of energy was supplied for the transport.

Cotransport

Explanation:Contransport is the coupled transport of chemical substances across a cell membrane in which the energy required to move a substance (such as glucose) against a gradient in concentration or in electrical potential is provided by the movement of another substance (such as a sodium ion) along its gradient in concentration or in electric potential.

An example is the Na+/glucose cotransporter (SGLT), which couples the movement of Na+ into the cell down its electrochemical gradient to the movement of glucose into the cell against its concentration gradient. Cotransport is also commonly referred to as symport.

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