vacuumed sealed pork roast had an odor when oƿє-ṅєd but the meat looked ok?

I went to the sam jr store this morning and bought a 10 pound roast. It was vacuumed sealed and didn’t expire until september 16 (didn’t noticed that until after I got home) When I went to cut the bag open there was a strong odor but faded after 30 seconds +/- The meat looked ok and cut it in half and it was fine to. The juice in the bag surrounding the roast looked ok as well. I did some internet research and only found one similar question and one person said it was ok. Its in the crock pot right now and since I have to walk didn’t feel like lugging it back to the store. What’s your thought.

7 Answers

  • Hi

    You’re almost certainly fine, as long as the smell went away after it had been oƿє-ṅєd a little while. It’s to do with it having been sealed – you can read more in the links below. It’s called ‘confinement odour’. If the meat is genuinely off it will continue to smell after it’s been oƿє-ṅєd, whereas confinement odours go away. If the meat is tinged green, or has a persistent unpelasant smell, then get rid of it.

    I base all my decisions about what is ok to eat on smell – your nose is pretty reliable, I think. if it’s off, you’d know about it (I certainly do, and I never ever get sick!). Lots of packaged food is packed with gases designed to keep them fresh. The turkey ham I eat has a distinctly ƒᴀʀтy odour when the pack is oƿє-ṅєd! But that doesn’t mean it’s off (just don’t do what I did and open the pack towards your face with a flourish, spattering yourself with ƒᴀʀтy ham juice…:-)).

    Here are some links to reassure you:

    http://www.broadstripebutchers.co.uk/storing.aspx

    Section ‘Opening up vacuum packs’

    "When you take meat out of a vacuum pack, you’ll often notice a surprising smell. Don’t worry, there’s nothing wrong with your meat, and as the oxygen returns to the meat it’ll disappear completely. In the same way, the colour of your meat will bloom. Beef and lamb will go a nice rosy red, while pork will turn a deep pink and veal a lighter pink."

    Page 13 of this:

    http://www.broadstripebutchers.co.uk/storing.aspx http://www.meatupdate.csiro.au/data/Meat_quality_a

  • Have had this happen twice, with Smithfield baby back ribs. Disgusting smell after opening bag. Learning from the first one I quickly moved into the laundry room with a vent fan on high and prepped the meat. Rinsed very well in cold water after assuring it was not slimy. Pulled the membrane and rinsed well again. Let it rest while I retrieved the rib rub and BbQ sauce. Then smelled it again, and the meat was fine. I have learned my lesson to prep the ribs prior to company arriving as this cryo-vac issue is something I never want company to experience! I have prepared the two stinky ribs both over the grill and in the oven both were fine and delicious. No one had any issues either time. Just open your pack prior to people arriving and prepare to air out the room.

    I heard once that if animals are slaughtered at certain times they will have a strong odor, something with ṃѧṭıṅɢ hormones. Maybe someone could comment.

  • Vacuumed Sealed

  • when meat is vacum packed it tends to ‘sweat’ a little in the packaging…when you open it up let the air at it for 5 mins…..then rinse your meat in cold water and put it into your roasting pan/crock….if the prok is off it will have a greenish tinge in parts and will smell really bad

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  • Marinating is one ingredient, yet putting lemon on fish, or meat, cнιcκen, beef, vegetables, brings out the style. i’m Greek, and we placed lemon on in basic terms approximately everthing. i discover it provides that freshness to meat and fish, and rather complements there organic flavour. delight in!

  • If it has ANY kind of funny taste when done? TOSS IT

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