Which best statement best reflects millay’s attitude toward the seasons?

Which best statement best reflects millay’s attitude toward the seasons?

Answers

C because the tone of her words are very mild and as if she is disgusted

2. Millay finds beauty in the autumn world but resents the rebirth of spring because she sees death and sorrow everywhere.

"To what purpose, April, do you return again?"

In this excerpt of Spring we can read how Millay´ loves autumn and finds it beatiful and peacefull, but april always brings the idea of a death autumn when spring comes so vividly.

the correct answer is B

The correct answer is B) Millay finds beauty in the autumn world but resents the rebirth of spring because she sees death and sorrow everywhere.

yes, we appreciate these things!

Having read the excerpt, the answer to the question is letter b. Millay finds beauty in the autumn world but resents the rebirth of spring because she sees death and sorrow everywhere. The other choices given were not that relevant compared to what is chosen. 
Millay loves all seasons in nature but is happiest in the autumn when leaves fall and the birds are flying away. Millay finds beauty in the autumn world but resents the rebirth of spring because she sees death and sorrow everywhere. Millay is a pessimist who dislikes beauty anywhere she sees it because it implies that all is right with the world. Millay is a religious poet who sees the divine in nature and reflected in the rebirth of plants in the spring.
Very joyful and excitedly happy 

the right answer is b. Millay finds beauty in the autumn world but resents the rebirth of spring because she sees death and sorrow everywhere.

Explanation: the author says: "...Thy woods, this autumn day, that ache and sag And all but cry with colour! ..." meaning that fall is colourful, then he says: "...Lord, I do fear Thou’st made the world too beautiful this year..." meaning the view is nice, after that he claims: "...let no bird call..." meaning please don't let birds call alluding to another season to come. At the end the author mentions another weather:"...April Comes like an idiot, babbling and strewing flowers..."

The statement that best reflects Millay's attitude toward the seasons is clearly and congruently the first one, which shows that Millay's is happiest in the Autumn, because even though Millay expresses her admiration for the surroundings and the beauty of the time on both Autumn and Spring, she describes the Autumn in a more dramatic way, very passionately, especially when she says "My soul is all but out of me" what clearly denotes an overwhelming feeling of great happiness or joyful excitement.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Posts