Which quotation correctly uses ellipsis to shorten lincoln’s words?

Which quotation correctly uses ellipsis to shorten lincoln’s words? now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation . . can long endure. we are met on a great battlefield of that war. now we are engaged in a great civil war . . testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. we are met on a great battlefield of that war. now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated . . we are met on a great battlefield of that war. now . . in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. we are met on a great battlefield of that war.

Answers

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation . . . can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war.

I do believe the answer is A. I chose A on my test and got it correct.

Explanation:

3 ) now we are engaged in a great

A. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation ... can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war.

Explanation:In t his excerpt from "The Gettysburg Address", Abraham Lincoln's famous speech, the quotation that correctly uses ellipsis to shorthen Lincoln's words is the option mentioned above. An ellipsis is a set of three periods ( ... ) that are used when it is necessary to omit part of the quotation. There is a space before and after each period. The omission must not change the meaning, and when it is whithin the sentence it should maintain the original punctuation.

"Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation . . . can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war."

Explanation:

The quotation above correctly uses ellipsis to shorten Lincoln's words.

First of all, an ellipsis is a set of three dots ( . . .) that is used to show an omission of an unnecessary information from a text that has little or no impact to the meaning of the sentence.

So, the first option above used the ellipsis correctly to shorten Lincoln's words  while maintaining the general meaning of the sentence.

3                                                  

Sorry im still typing the answer isn't 20 characters long yet                        

It's A. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation... can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war.

Explanation:

Passed on the quiz for Edgenuity.

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation . . . can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war.

Explanation:

hope this helps

correct me if this is wrong

The bottom option. The second option doesn’t take out any words so there is no need for ellipses and the first and third quotations take out words that are more necessary to understand the entire quote

The correct answer is A.

Explanation:

The best way to shorten Lincoln's famous words is to take out the apposition following the word "nation," since it is not as relevant as the other parts of the speech.

Answer B is wrong because it does not elide any part of the speech.

Answer C is not correct either because it eliminates the predicate of the sentence, making it incomplete.

And answer D is also incorrect because it takes out both the subject and the main verb, leaving another incomplete sentence.

Hottest videos

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Posts